Widely used antiseptic increases the resistance of bacteria to antibiotics

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Scientists at Washington University (Washington University) have shown that the widely publicized antiseptic triclosan makes bacteria insensitive to the action of antibiotics. According to the author of the research, Petra Levin, a drug designed to kill bacteria, in fact, produces immunity in microbes even from the strongest drugs.

Triclosan is a bacteriostatic inhibitor of fatty acid synthesis, an antimicrobial agent that is added to household chemicals: toothpastes, mouthwashes, mouthwashes, and detergents. In large quantities accumulates in the human body.

American scientists found out that in the USA, where even the fabric of underwear and children's toys are treated with an antiseptic, 75% of the population has triclosan in their urine, and 10% have their parameter increased several times.

Rodent studies have shown that elevated concentrations of triclosan increased E. coli resistance to antibiotics 10,000 times and reduced the effectiveness of the drug almost 100 times. Under the influence of an antiseptic, every tenth bacterium becomes insensitive to the antibiotic, whereas only every thousandth microbe survives without triclosan.

The immunity of microorganisms is produced even in relation to the most effective bactericidal preparations, including ciprofloxacin, which is most often used in the treatment of infections of the urinary system and the gastrointestinal tract.

According to scientists, the results obtained in the course of research should encourage humanity to reassess the attitude not only to triclosan, but also to all other antiseptic agents that can accumulate in the body and overload the immune system.

Reference to the study: aac.asm.org.

. (tagsToTranslate) triclosan antiseptic agent antibiotic bacterium drug study

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